Lighting Portraits Broad vs Short Studio Setups

Learn how to create amazing studio portraits with 2 different lighting techniques. Find out when you should use broad and short lighting and the importance of a light reflector.

Transcript from YouTube

Welcome to better picks in just a few clicks today. We’re going to look at Short lighting versus broad lighting let’s take a look. Portraits aren’t going to be necessarily straight on. In fact, most of the time we want the model to be off to the side a little bit turning their head we see the light is coming off to the side cast a nice light onto starless face that is further from the camera so I’ll go ahead and turn and look a little more this direction and now she’s in turn a little more towards the camera with your eyes there you go and a little more with your head too right there so now the side the further side of her face is now being more Starla now I could do two different things I could make it broad lighting by actually physically moving the light to the other side or I could actually have the model really turn the scene flip the scene so Starla go ahead and turn this way and then she’ll look towards me this way now the closer side of the face is actually getting broad lit right here and there now these are using a one light setup I’m only using my Beauty Dish set up here which is a round setup which helps give a roundness in the uh catch light of the eyes which is very natural like the sun but I’m going to add in a reflector to kind of change some of that tone so staying right there Starla we’re gonna bring in a reflector now you could bring in a different light as well what I’m using here is just a very large about a five and a half foot six foot reflector to bounce in light to change the shadow so it’s not quite as dramatic you’ll see the difference there on Starla’sface it does make a difference as the light reflects onto the face lighting the close side the broadside face and let’s go and flip around for the short light Starla facing your feet towards the camera or towards the light sorry and looking right here and now more of the short style lighting and look more off this side I’m going to change a little more direction as we change our light a little bit it can change some of the style of how dramatic or how intense that short lighter broad lighting is it’s not all the way 90 degree angle from me to the camera. I like to go about 60 to 50 degree angle somewhere in between it’s not straight flat for the camera it’s not all the way to the side it’s somewhere in between and you have some variation as photographer Choice. Short Lighting: Why does it make a difference depending if you want to add a little more drama you want to actually with a broad lighting light the person so it’s easy to recognize them as this is so and so we’re short lighting is a little more uh dramatic there’s more Shadow and it does help to slenderize the face and gives a very attractive portrait as well thanks for watching better picks in just a few clicks make sure you hit that like button and subscribe to see more videos on how to take your photography to the next level.

#betterpix #dust2life #portraits #howtophotography

Kid’s Creative Photography over Niagara Falls and Fireworks

Does creative photography have to be difficult? With the proper tools and a little know-how, even young children can get excellent results. See what happened when I gave my boys a few pointers and a tripod and let them loose over Niagara Falls at night with fireworks. Which is your favorite?

2 Second Shutter Canon R6
Niagara Falls Fireworks 2 seconds Canon R6
Niagara Falls 6 seconds Canon R6
Niagara Falls Galaxy S10e at 1/120 shutter HDR mode

Creative Photography in the Ocean Using ND and Polarizer Filters

Do you really need to use camera filters with Digital Photography??? In the world of Social Media filters, learn how and why to use your Neutral Density and Polarizer filters when photographing the Portland Lighthouse, the most photographed lighthouse in the world. Photographed near Portland, Maine, using the Canon R6 and the RF 24-105mm F/4.

No Filters
ND and Polarizer Filters

#ndfilter #polarizerfilter #creativefilters #howtophotography #canonr6 #canonmirrorless #instagramfilters #betterpix #dust2life

Brainless Professional Photography with Canon R6

Brainless Photography with Canon R6

I test out the Programmed Mode, er…Pathetic Mode, in the mirrorless Canon R6. Does the upgraded technology have what it takes to create professional photography without using your cerebrum? Would you use it to photograph a wedding?

#betterpix #dust2life #howtophotography #photographylife #vacayphotos #photographyislife #canonr6 #mirrorlesscameras #canonphotography

Unique Studio Light Drawing with a Projector

Photography by definition means “Drawing with Light”. In this 90-second video, learn how to push your creative abilities and grow your photographic abilities. Think outside the box and stretch your PROFESSIONAL photographic skills. I will teach you the basics to get yourself started in literally “Drawing with Light.”

Transcript from YouTube

Today on better picks we’re gonna be using a projector lighting and just a camera because photography is drawing with light so this week I decided to work with projector lighting. Something I’ve been inspired with for a while and experimented with lower quality projectors I upgraded the projector to a laser light very intense bright which allowed me to use a faster shutter speed than I was able or to keep my ISO at a more manageable rate choosing different backgrounds that I download and given a different shape a different light a different form and sometimes using the image itself to wrap around the eye or the body in a certain way that gives us the image one of the things with projector lighting you have to be careful of is your projector will not give you the intensity if you’re using a strobe light so you’ll have to go to a slower shutter speed raise your ISO a bit I like to shoot in the low 100 or 200 range for studio work but here I would raise up to 2000 ISO and I did use a little bit of noise reduction in post-production in Adobe Camera Raw to take down some of the noise which did soften the image but I thought it was a good compromise. I used a slower shutter speed a 1/60th a second making sure I used an image stabilizer in my lens allowed me to make sure that the subject was not blurry from my camera shake so projector lighting is all about shape and form and experimentation and trying something different but the creativity aspect of pushing yourself to do something you’ve never tried before is something that you really should experiment with it’ll make you a better photographer it’ll make your work stronger in the future.

#studiolighting #howtophotography #photographyhack #photographyislife #portraits #photographylife #betterpix #dust2life #drawingwithlight #artist

Studio Lighting with Split and Monster Patterns

Do you have what it takes to photograph in the studio? In this short 2-minute video, learn how to create amazing studio portraits with 2 different lighting techniques–Split and Monster lighting. Be careful, these techniques are very dramatic and not to be used by just anyone.

Transcript from YouTube

For this light setup, we’re going to be using a split lady where the main light is almost to the side of Abby our model, and very much at the opposite angle of me almost 90-degree angle to the photographer and off to the subject, this creates a very dramatic side we see light on one side and very quickly we’ll fall off almost no detail on the other side let’s take a look there you go looking right here maybe kind of lean forward just a little bit there you go excellent.

That’s cool very dramatic same thing I’m gonna bring in a reflector the large reflector again it could be something as cheap as a couple of dollars Elmer’s board. Here is an excellent split with a reflector much different look and if i want i could even come here and i could do a harsher look move away the reflector and go to a stockless option which is going to be much harsher for my light because i’m taking off the sock i’m going to lose i’m going to make it a much more intense light so i have to turn down the light because i’m much brighter let’s turn it down about a stop and a half looking here much more harsh punchy one two and three a little more dramatic style between the different looks so variations that you can do between with a sock without the diffusion with the reflector without the reflector make a big difference on the final product for our next lighting setup we’ll look at a monster lighting I’ve taken the main light from being high and beautiful like typically on a subject and i put it nice and low pointed up at the subject this comes from a lot of horror films that use a low style of lighting that’s kind of where we’ve assumed or we have been conditioned to a monster lighting and it can be a little more spooky style sometimes maybe kind of glamorous i’m coming with the shot nice and low one two and three and create a lot of light there’s no not gonna be shadows under the neck but it’s gonna be different style of shooting.

Split with Diffusion Sock
Split with Reflector
Split with no Diffusion Sock

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Lighting Portraits Rembrandt, Butterfly and Clamshell

In this short 3-minute video, learn how to create amazing studio portraits with 3 different lighting techniques.

Rembrandt
Butterfly
Clamshell

Transcript from YouTube

For this light setup we’re going to be using a split lady where the main light is almost to the side of Abby our model and very much at the opposite angle of me almost 90-degree angle to the photographer and off to the subject, this creates a very dramatic side we see light on one side and very quickly we’ll fall off almost no detail on the other side let’s take a look there you go looking right here maybe kind of lean forward just a little bit there you go excellent. That’s cool very dramatic same thing I’m gonna bring in a reflector the large reflector again it could be something as cheap as a couple dollar Elmer board something like that excellent split with a reflector much different look and if i want i could even come here and i could do a harsher look move away the reflector and go to a stockless option which is going to be much harsher for my light because i’m taking off the sock i’m going to lose i’m going to make it a much more intense light so i have to turn down the light because i’m much brighter let’s turn it down about a stop and a half looking here much more harsh punchy one two and three a little more dramatic style between the different looks so variations that you can do between with a sock without the diffusion with the reflector without the reflector make a big difference on the final product for our next lighting setup we’ll look at a monster lighting i’ve taken the main light from being high and beautiful like typically on a subject and i put it nice and low pointed up at the subject this comes from a lot of horror films that use a low style of lighting that’s kind of where we’ve assumed or we have been conditioned to a monster lighting and it can be a little more spooky style sometimes maybe kind of glamorous i’m coming with the shot nice and low one two and three and create a lot of light there’s no not gonna be shadows under the neck but it’s gonna be different style of shooting.

Conceptual Vision Combined with Digital Montage

Go behind the scenes of the fine art image, Lust (2 Timothy 4:2-4), from Dust to Life ~ the Visual Gospel. Also, see the conceptual inspirations and purpose behind each image. A detailed tutorial using Adobe Photoshop to see how the complex digital montage process was put together.

Includes the preproduction, production and post-production details. Concentrates on the Adjustment Layers and Smart Objects. Please Comment with any questions.

Better Pix

Welcome to Better Pix. My Vlog on how to create better pictures quickly and easily. I hope you learn how to create pictures using the tools of the camera and Photoshop and love photography as much as I do.

Tim Mielke